Upcoming Events

    • 03/16/2018
    • Banquet and Conference Center of Dewitt (Dewitt, Mi)

    Sorry, registration is not open yet.  

    Date: March 16, 2018

    Location: Banquet and Conference Center of Dewitt 

    Hotel: Sleep Inn, 1101 Commerce Park Dr., DeWitt, MI 48820

    Hotel cut-off date: Thursday, February 15, 2018

    Title: Recent Advances in Understanding Word-Level Reading Problems: Assessment and Highly Effective Intervention

    The presentation will focus on how children learn to read words and why some children struggle. This knowledge will be used to design more educationally relevant assessments and to guide intervention recommendations. Studies consistently show that the most commonly used reading interventions provide limited benefits. However, research has also shown that there are approaches available that yield very large and sustained reading gains for weak readers. 

    Objectives for School Psychologists

    As a result of this session, participants will be able to:

    1. Explain to teachers and parents how word-level reading skills develop and why some students struggle with those skills.

    2. Assemble a battery of assessments that will allow them to pinpoint precisely why a student is struggling in reading. 

    3. Administer and interpret the Phonological Awareness Screening Test.

    4. Recommend to general and special educational teachers and administrators the most highly effective intervention approaches.

    5. Recommend to administrators and K-1 teachers instructional practices that will prevent most reading difficulties from occurring in the first place.

    David A. Kilpatrick, PhD is an associate professor of psychology for the State University of New York, College at Cortland. He is a New York State certified school psychologist with 28 years experience in schools. He has been teaching courses in learning disabilities and educational psychology since 1994. David is a reading researcher and the author of two books on reading, Essentials of Assessing, Preventing, and Overcoming Reading Difficulties, and Equipped for Reading Success.

    • 06/20/2018
    • Mission Point, Mackinac island

    Sorry, registration is not open yet.  

    The PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention & Intervention Curriculum

    Workshop 1:  Crisis Prevention and Preparedness: Comprehensive School Safety Planning

    This 1-day workshop provides school mental health professionals, administrators, security officers, and other educators knowledge and resources important to establishing and sustaining comprehensive, ongoing school safety and crisis prevention, mitigation, and preparedness. Making use of existing personnel, resources, and programs, PREPaRE can be adapted to a school’s needs and size. Specific attention is given to developing, exercising and evaluating safety/crisis teams and plans, and integrating school and community crisis response personnel. Also addressed are issues associated with the media, social media, technology, students with special needs, culture, and memorials. Training reinforces improved school climate, student behavior and academic functioning, student resilience, and school staff crisis response capabilities.

    The NASP PREPaRE curriculum provides relevant school personnel with comprehensive training on how to establish and serve on school safety and crisis response teams. The second edition of the curriculum integrates the roles of existing school staff and community providers in terms of the five crisis preparedness mission areas (prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery) and grounds them in ongoing school safety efforts. The curriculum incorporates basic principles articulated by the U.S. Departments of Education (2013) and Homeland Security (2008), as well as the Incident Command System delineated by the National Incident Management System (NIMS). 

    The PREPaRE model emphasizes the following hierarchical and sequential set of activities:

    P—Prevent and prepare for psychological trauma

    R—Reaffirm physical health and perceptions of security and safety

    E—Evaluate psychological trauma risk

    P—Provide interventions

    a—and

    R—Respond to psychological needs

    E—Examine the effectiveness of crisis prevention and intervention


    • 06/21/2018
    • 06/22/2018
    • Mission Point, Mackinac island

    Sorry, registration is not open yet.

    The PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention & Intervention Curriculum

    WORKSHOP 2 Crisis Intervention and Recovery: The Roles of School-Based Mental Health Professionals

    This 2-day workshop provides school-based mental health professionals and other school crisis intervention team members with the knowledge necessary to meet the mental health needs of students and staff following school-associated crisis events. This workshop teaches participants how to prevent and prepare for psychological trauma, help to reaffirm both the physical health of members of the school community and students’ perceptions that they are safe and secure, evaluate conduct psychological triage, respond to the psychological needs of the school community utilizing a multitiered approach, and examine the effectiveness of school crisis intervention and recovery efforts. This workshop is an excellent course for all professionals in your district who provide mental health crisis intervention services.

    The NASP PREPaRE curriculum provides relevant school personnel with comprehensive training on how to establish and serve on school safety and crisis response teams. The second edition of the curriculum integrates the roles of existing school staff and community providers in terms of the five crisis preparedness mission areas (prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery) and grounds them in ongoing school safety efforts. The curriculum incorporates basic principles articulated by the U.S. Departments of Education (2013) and Homeland Security (2008), as well as the Incident Command System delineated by the National Incident Management System (NIMS). 

    The PREPaRE model emphasizes the following hierarchical and sequential set of activities:

    P—Prevent and prepare for psychological trauma

    R—Reaffirm physical health and perceptions of security and safety

    E—Evaluate psychological trauma risk

    P—Provide interventions

    a—and

    R—Respond to psychological needs

    E—Examine the effectiveness of crisis prevention and intervention


    • 11/08/2018
    • 11/09/2018
    • Crystal Mountain, Mi

    Sorry, registration is not open yet.

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